Ask the Vet: Vaccines for Indoor Cats

Ask the Vet: Vaccines for Indoor Cats

Ask the Vet: Vaccines for Indoor Cats
All responsible owners should vaccinate their cats against the major diseases that are recommended by veterinarians in order to prevent the spread and the dangers of infections. We aim to use the minimum vaccination needed whilst providing the maximum cover. FELINE VIRAL RHINOTRACHEITIS: This is a severe upper respiratory infection that is most dangerous to young kittens and older cats. Non-neoplastic type clinical signs are immunosuppression, anaemia and reproductive disorders When to vaccinate? If earlier vaccination if desirable or necessary, vaccination is appropriate from 6 weeks of age onwards, but should be followed by the normal vaccination scheme at 8-9 and 12 weeks of age. Every cat should have this vaccine at about 6-8 weeks of age and the vaccine will need to be repeated every 3-4 weeks until he or she is about 16 weeks old. Conjunctivitis may be a primary condition or may be secondary to an underlying systemic or ocular (eye) disease (see also our handout “Conjunctivitis”).

This vaccine was specially formulated to reduce the occurrence of vaccine-associated fibrosarcomas (a type of cancer) in cats. These diseases don’t actually exist outside a lab in New Mexico. For kittens, the rabies vaccine should be administered as a single dose as early as 8 to 12 weeks of age (depending on vaccine type and label recommendations). Protection against infectious agents involves a complex interplay between humoral immunity, cellular immunity, or a combination of both. Vaccination should be performed as often as necessary, but as infrequently as possible. RHINOTRACHEITIS is the other major cause (along with Calici described above) of upper respiratory tract (cold-like) disease in cats. Whether your veterinarian chooses an annual or tri-annual rabies vaccine may be determined by government regulations.

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