Cat Vaccinations FAQ | A Cat Hospital

Cat Vaccinations FAQ | A Cat Hospital

Vaccinations are a very important part of cat ownership. The initial vaccine course is often given at 8-9 weeks of age, with a second injection 3-4 weeks later. Fel-O-Vax IV + Calicivax™ (item 86927) By Boehringer Ingelheim. Onset of this disease is very rapid and can often be fatal. An initial serous nasal and ocular discharge which rapidly becomes mucopurulent is typical of the disease. The virus leads to a failure of a cat’s immune system. Feline respiratory disease affects cats of all ages, especially young kittens, Siamese and Burmese cats.

Kittens should receive a series of vaccine boosters against these viruses and adult cats should be kept current. Since tom cats mark their territory by spraying and urine is one of the ways certain diseases are spread, this increases the risk of transmission. A full booster is required after 12 months and we then recommend annual vaccinations and healthchecks for your cat. Most kittens who contract this disease do not survive. Our Las Vegas veterinarian will make vaccine recommendations based on your cat’s overall health. Core vaccines are cat vaccinations that are considered vital to your cat’s health. Emerald Animal Hospital offers a number of vaccinations including: Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis Calicivirus Infection Panleukopenia (FVRCP), Rabies, and Feline Leukemia for cats as well as dewormers, flea and heartworm prevention, and even surgery.
Cat Vaccinations FAQ | A Cat Hospital

Since decreased tear film production has been associated with FHV-1 conjunctivitis, specific tests to assess the tear production may be recommended. In kittens, this vaccine is administered every four weeks from the ages of eight to sixteen weeks. In 7 years of practice, I have never diagnosed an active rabies infection in a pet cat. It also allows a regular opportunity for your veterinarian to perform a physical examination, which is very important for keeping your cat healthy. For certain diseases, such as feline panleukopenia, evaluation of antibody titers can be a valuable diagnostic indicator to determine when revaccination may be needed.1,2 For other diseases, a serological response has not been identified that correlates with protection. In 1991, an increased incidence of tumours in cats that developed at injection sites was first reported in the United States (Hendrick and Dunagan, 1991). In some cases the Rhinotracheitis virus can attack the liver resulting in severe illness and usually death.

Vaccination with FVRCP is protecting your cat, not at home, but in the unforeseen situation where she must board while you are away, or she requires hospitalization for an illness or injury or when you can’t resist adding a second fur baby to your family. Kittens receive initial vaccination protection from this milk. However, after they are weaned and their immune systems are still developing, they are at risk for contracting deadly diseases. The kitten shot series typically begins at 8 to 10 weeks of age and will be administered in three or four week intervals until a cat reaches 16 weeks of age. Box of 25 doses. Every cat is different and that is why your veterinarian will advise you on which diseases your cat needs to be protected from based on their environment and lifestyle. Oral lesions may be observed postvaccinally, but typically heal without incident.

If you think your cat is having a reaction to a vaccination, immediately contact our Las Vegas cat veterinarian.

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