Demands Increase for ‘Vaginal Seeding’ In C-Section Babies but Is It Safe?

Demands Increase for 'Vaginal Seeding' In C-Section Babies but Is It Safe?

Demands Increase for 'Vaginal Seeding' In C-Section Babies but Is It Safe?
We characterized the populations of primary sensory neurons that become latently infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV) following peripheral inoculation. Despite its worldwide spread, a general consensus on the most appropriate technique to use has not yet been reached. Cesarean section, one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures on women, is rising globally and in the USA. Because of active lesions, C-sections were performed on 28 women. Not only do these scientists say that there is no evidence that microbirthing actually helps, but they also want mothers to be aware that they could be exposing their newborns to an array of dangers including group B strep, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and the herpes simplex virus. Aubrey Cunnington from the Department of Medicine at Imperial College London and lead author of an article published in BMJ. Only about 1 percent of women who had a C-section gave birth to a child with HSV, compared with nearly 8 percent who delivered vaginally.

In February 2016, a study was conducted to see if a process called “vaginal seeding” – exposing babies to their mothers’ vaginal bacteria – could help babies born via C-section develop a microbiome more similarly to babies born vaginally. When there is known sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) present, swabbing is not a good idea. The TEM images of the sections in panel c, sections 1 to 4, therefore correspond to the boxes in panel b, sections 1 to 4. Six (20%) had serious neurological sequelae. However, obstetricians do not appear to avoid these procedures in women who are on suppressive therapy. This microbe-laden gauze came out right before the C-sections began.

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