Genital Herpes – Physicians for Women, Danbury, Ridgefield, CT, Connecticut

Genital Herpes - Physicians for Women, Danbury, Ridgefield, CT, Connecticut

Most people never have symptoms, or the symptoms are so mild that people don’t know that they are infected. But in some people, the infection causes occasional outbreaks of itchy and painful sores in the genital area. After the first outbreak, the herpes virus stays in the nerve cells below the skin and becomes inactive. Most people never have symptoms, or the symptoms are so mild that people don’t know that they are infected. Things like stress, illness, a new sex partner, or menstruation may trigger a new outbreak. As time goes on, the outbreaks happen less often, heal faster, and don’t hurt as much. Genital herpes is caused by a virus—either the herpes simplex virus type 1 or the herpes simplex virus type 2.

Either virus can cause sores on the lips (cold sores) and sores on the genitals. Type 1 more often causes cold sores, while type 2 more often causes genital sores. Symptoms can vary greatly from person to person. Most people never have any symptoms. Sometimes the symptoms are so mild that people may not notice them or recognize them as a sign of herpes. For people who do notice their first infection, it generally appears about 2 to 14 days after they were exposed to genital herpes. Some people have outbreaks of itchy and painful blisters on the penis or around the opening of the vagina.

The blisters break open and turn into oozing, shallow sores that take up to 3 weeks to heal. Sometimes people, especially women, also have flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and muscle aches. They may also notice an abnormal discharge and pain when they urinate. Your doctor may diagnose genital herpes by examining you. He or she may ask you questions about your symptoms and your risk factors, which are things that make you more likely to get an infection. If this is your first outbreak, your doctor may take a sample of tissue from the sore for testing. Testing can help the doctor be sure that you have herpes.

You may also have a blood test. Although there is no cure, medicine can relieve pain and itching and help sores heal faster. If you have a lot of outbreaks, you may take medicine every day to limit the number of outbreaks. After the first outbreak, some people have just a few more outbreaks over their lifetime, while others may have 4 to 6 outbreaks a year. Usually the number of outbreaks decreases after a few years. Before you start a sexual relationship, talk with your partner about STIs. Find out whether he or she is at risk for them.

Remember that a person can be infected without knowing it. If you have symptoms of an STI, don’t have sex. Find out whether he or she is at risk for them. Don’t have more than one sexual relationship at a time. Having several sex partners increases your risk for infection. Use condoms. Condom use lowers the risk of spreading or becoming infected with an STI.

Don’t receive oral sex from partners who have cold sores. Taking medicine for herpes may lower the number of outbreaks you have and can also prevent an episode from getting worse. It also lower the chances that you will infect your partner. If you are pregnant, you should take extra care to avoid getting infected. You could pass the infection to your baby during delivery, which can cause serious problems for your newborn. If you have an outbreak near your due date, you probably will need to have your baby by cesarean section. If your genital herpes outbreaks return again and again, your doctor may talk to you about medicines that can help prevent an outbreak during pregnancy.

Genital herpes can be caused by either the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). HSV-1 or HSV-2 can cause sores on the lips (cold sores) and sores on the genitals. HSV-1 more often causes cold sores. HSV-2 more often causes genital sores. Even very small breaks in the skin allow the virus to infect the body. So herpes can be spread to or from the genitals, anus, or mouth during sexual activities or through any direct contact with herpes sores. You are most likely to spread herpes when you have a herpes sore or blister.

But many people have time periods (a week before and a week after an outbreak) when they can still spread the virus even though they don’t have symptoms. And some people spread the infection because they don’t realize that they have a herpes sore. Or they may have different symptoms, such as painful urination, that they don’t realize are part of an outbreak. So herpes can be spread to or from the genitals, anus, or mouth during sexual activities or through any direct contact with herpes sores. These symptoms usually get better within a week. Tingling, burning, itching, and rednessat the site where an outbreak is about to occur. Painful, itchy blisterson the penis, on the vulva, or inside the vagina.

Blisters may also appear on the anus, buttocks, thighs, or scrotum, either alone or in clusters. Tingling, burning, itching, and rednessat the site where an outbreak is about to occur. Painful, oozing sorescaused by blisters that break open. Swollen and tenderlymph nodesin the groin. Painful urination. Abnormal dischargefrom the vagina or penis. The herpes virus stays in your body for the rest of your life.

After the first outbreak, it becomes inactive. Then, in most people, it gets active again from time to time, causing blisters and sores. Some people have many outbreaks each year, while others have only a few or none at all. People who have symptoms average 5 outbreaks a year during the first few years. Most have fewer outbreaks after that. About half of the people who have repeated outbreaks can feel one coming a few hours to a couple of days before it happens. They may feel tingling, burning, itching, numbness, tenderness, or pain where the blisters are about to appear.

In rare cases, a newborn is infected with the herpes virus during delivery. Because their immune systems aren’t fully developed, newborns with herpes infection can have serious health problems affecting many body systems. It may take up to 3 weeks after a newborn is infected before he or she becomes ill. If the mother has a genital herpes blister or sore at the time of labor and delivery, a cesarean section is usually done. Cesarean section may be recommended if a woman has tingling or pain suggesting an impending outbreak. Having more than one sex partner. Having a high-risk partner or partners (partner has more than one sex partner or has herpes-infected sex partners).

Genital Herpes - Physicians for Women, Danbury, Ridgefield, CT, Connecticut
Having unprotected sexual contact (not using condoms). Starting sexual activity at a young age. If the mother has a genital herpes blister or sore at the time of labor and delivery, a cesarean section is usually done. Having a weakened immune system. Being a woman. Women are more likely than men to become infected when exposed to genital herpes. And their symptoms tend to be more severe and longer-lasting.

Being a woman. Any child with genital herpes needs to be evaluated by a doctor to see if it is the result of sexual abuse. For more information, see the topic Child Abuse and Neglect. Painful blisters or sores in the genital or pelvic area. Burning or pain while urinating, or you are unable to urinate. Abnormal discharge from the vagina or penis. Reason to think you’ve been exposed to genital herpes.

Do you think you were exposed to genital herpes or another sexually transmitted infection (STI)? How do you know? Did your partner tell you? What are your symptoms? Do you have sores in the genital area or anywhere else on your body? Do they usually come and go? Do you have any urinary symptoms, including frequent urination, burning or stinging with urination, or urinating in small amounts?

If you have discharge from the vagina or penis, does it have any smell or color? What method of birth control do you use? Did you use condoms to protect against STIs? What are your sexual practices and your partner’s sexual practices? Have you had an STI in the past? How was it treated? Medicines to make blisters and sores less painful and heal faster or to help prevent outbreaks.

For more information, see Medications. What are your sexual practices and your partner’s sexual practices? For more information, see Home Treatment. Taking steps to prevent the spread of genital herpes. These include avoiding any sexual contact if you (or your partner) have symptoms or are being treated for genital herpes. For more information, see Prevention. Taking steps to prevent the spread of genital herpes.

You can also take steps to keep from giving herpes to your sex partner(s). Talk with your partner about STIs before beginning a sexual relationship. Find out whether he or she is at risk for an STI. Remember that it is quite possible to have an STI without knowing it. Some STIs, such as HIV, can take up to 6 months before they can be detected in the blood. Be responsible. Avoid sexual contact if you have symptoms of an STI or are being treated for an STI.

Avoid sexual contact with anyone who has symptoms of an STI or who may have been exposed to an STI. Condoms must be in place before the start of sexual contact. Use condoms with a new partner until you are certain that he or she doesn’t have an STI. You can use either male condoms or female condoms. Tell your doctor if you have been exposed to genital herpes or have had an outbreak in the past. Let your doctor know if you are currently having an outbreak, especially if you are in the last part of your pregnancy. Avoid unsafe sex.

Herpes is often transmitted by people who don’t know they are infected and don’t have symptoms. Use condoms. Avoid receiving oral sex from partners who have cold sores. Herpes in newborns can be caused by HSV-1, the virus that most commonly causes cold sores. Most experts advise pregnant women not to receive oral sex in the last 3 months of their pregnancy. It increases their risk of genital infection with HSV-1. Antiviral medicine can be used safely in pregnancy to reduce the risk of an outbreak at the time of delivery.

Use condoms. If you are having a genital herpes outbreak, wash your hands after using the bathroom or having any contact with blisters or sores. This is especially important for people who are caring for babies. Take warm sitz baths or wash the area with warm water 3 or 4 times a day. In between sitz baths, keep the sores clean and dry. This is especially important for people who are caring for babies. Wear cotton underpants, which absorb moisture better than those made from synthetic material.

If you have 6 or more outbreaks a year or have severe outbreaks, you may benefit from taking antiviral medicine every day. It may reduce the number of outbreaks by about 1 or 2 episodes a year. If you take antiviral medicine every day, you may want to talk to your doctor about not taking the medicine for a short period each year. This can show whether your outbreaks are starting to occur less frequently. Then you can decide whether to keep taking the medicine. Need daily antiviral medicine to prevent recurrent outbreaks. Develop a resistance to some antiviral medicines.

For these people, other medicines are available, but they must be given through a vein (intravenously, or IV) and can have dangerous side effects. Other Works Consulted American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (2007, reaffirmed 2009). Management of herpes in pregnancy. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 82. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 109(6): 1489–1498. Cernik C, et al.

(2008). The treatment of herpes simplex infections: An evidence-based review. Archives of Internal Medicine, 168(11): 1137–1144. Johnston C, et al. (2010). Genital herpes. Then you can decide whether to keep taking the medicine.

169–185. Philadelphia: Saunders. Schiffer JT, Corey L (2010). Herpes simplex virus. Philadelphia: Saunders. 1943–1962. Philadelphia: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier.

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