Herpes simplex virus. An expanding relationship to human cancer. – Abstract

Herpes simplex virus. An expanding relationship to human cancer. - Abstract

A risk factor is anything that increases a person’s chance of developing cancer. Virus-neutralizing and hemagglutinating antibodies to the virus type II are detected reliably more frequently in cervical cancer patients than in healthy ones. The affected cells show enlarged single, or more commonly, multiple nuclei with nuclear molding. Accumulating evidence indicates that, aside from the extent of replication capability within the tumor, the efficacy of an oncolytic HSV-1 depends on the extent of induction of host antitumor immune responses. In a sample of 100 sera from university students, 40 were positive by complement-dependent lysis whereas 73 were positive by ADCC. Studies showed a higher incidence of infection with HSV-2 in cervical cancer patients as compared with matched controls. Second is searching for evidence of HSV markers in premalignant and malignant lesions.
Herpes simplex virus. An expanding relationship to human cancer. - Abstract

The results were analysed with R using haplo.stats software version 1.5.2. These observations suggest that HSV-2 is not a typical DNA tumor virus. Greenlandic women had significantly more sexual partners, earlier age at first intercourse, more current smokers and less use of barrier contraceptives compared to the Danish women. In present study the author used HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system, combined with 60Co radiation, to conduct in vitro and in vivo experiments on human cervical cancer Hela. Attempts are being made to determine the fragment of viral DNA responsible for transformation. Fourth is development of animal models for virus-induced cervical cancer. A mouse model is showing promise.

Girls younger than 15 rarely develop cervical cancer. Cancer of the vulva has recently been associated with genital HSV infection.

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