Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 infection: overview on relevant clinico-pathological features – Arduino – 2007 – Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine

Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 infection: overview on relevant clinico-pathological features - Arduino - 2007 - Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine

Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 infection: overview on relevant clinico-pathological features - Arduino - 2007 - Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine
Abstract: Herpetic gingivostomatitis is the most common specific clinical manifestation of primary herpes simplex infection in childhood. These mouth ulcers are not the same as canker sores, which are not caused by a virus. Results of PCR of peripheral blood samples were positive for 11 subjects (34.4%). Diagnosis of herpetic stomatitis is based largely on clinical findings as the presence of typical intra-oral and extra-oral lesions is indicative of the disease. The treatment is mostly based on symptoms and supportive in nature. The oral lesions can persist for 7 to 18 days with the risk of dehydration [2]. Recurrent HSV-1 infection within the mouth is uncommon in otherwise healthy patients, although in immunocompromised patients, recurrent infection can be more extensive and/or aggressive.

The main complications were dehydration, with three children hospitalized for intravenous rehydration, and one case of secondary bacteremia. SymptomsBlisters in the mouth, often on the tongue, cheeks, roof of the mouth, gums, and on the border between the inside of the lip and the skin next to itAfter blisters pop, they form ulcers in the mouth, often on the tongue or cheeksDifficulty swallowingDroolingFever (often as high as 104 °Fahrenheit), which may occur 1 – 2 days before blisters and ulcers appearIrritabilityMouth painSwollen gums Symptoms may be so uncomfortable that your child doesn’t want to eat or drink.

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