Hospital-Acquired Infections Follow-up: Deterrence/Prevention

Hospital-Acquired Infections Follow-up: Deterrence/Prevention

Hospital-Acquired Infections Follow-up: Deterrence/Prevention
(1)        Prevents serious diseases, infectious and/or conditions caused by highly contagious organisms that do not require strict isolation. so on the nclex i was wondering do ALL patients under airborne, droplet, contact precautions need their own private room? Measles infections appear all over the world. High security isolation units – these are usually part of an infectious diseases hospital. Precautions include use of single-patient rooms, negative air-pressure ventilation, and N95 respirator masks or higher. Standard precautions apply to all patients receiving care in hospitals. Droplet precautions are used to prevent transmission of droplets containing microorganisms propelled less than 3 feet by coughing or sneezing by an infected person.

Improving Staff Compliance With Isolation Precautions Through Use of an Educational Intervention and Behavioral Contract. Conditions/pathogens for which droplet precautions should be used include adenovirus, diphtheria, H influenzae type b, hemorrhagic fever viruses, influenza, mumps, M pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, parvovirus B19, pertussis, plague (pneumonic), rubella, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), streptococcal pharyngitis, pneumonia, or scarlet fever. Contact precautions are used to prevent transmission of microorganisms via direct or indirect contact with infected or colonized persons. Precautions include use of single-patient room (if not feasible, cohort patients infected with the same organism), use of gowns and gloves, and hand hygiene after glove removal. Once someone is infected with the virus, it takes about 7-18 days before he or she actually becomes ill.

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