Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) – Abby’s Health & Nutrition

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) - Abby's Health & Nutrition

Related Terms 16-Hydroxy-9-oxo-10E,12E,14E-octadecatrienoic acid, alpha-cellulose, alpha-tocopherol, apigenin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, apigenin kaempferol, ash, a-tocopherol, balm, balm mint, bee balm, beta-caryophyllene, beta-caryophyllene oxide, beta-citronellol, beta-geraniol, beta-pinene, Bienenfang (German), Bienenkraut (German), Bienensaug (German), blue balm, caffeic acids, caftaric acid, carotenoids, chlorogenic acid, chlorophyll, Citra, citragon (French), citral, citral a (geranial), citral b (neral), citraria (Spanish), citroenmelisse (Dutch), citromfu (Hungarian), citron melisse (Danish), citronella (Italian), citronellae, citronellal, citronelle (French), citronellol, Citronenmelisse (German), citronmeliss (Swedish), citronmilisse (Danish), common balm, corchorifatty acid B, cure-all, Cyracos®, Darmgichtkraut (German), dehydroabietane, delphinidin, diterpene hydrocarbons, dropsy plant, Englische Brennessel (German), English balm, erva-cidreira (Portuguese – Brazil), ethric oil, eugenylglycoside, ferulic acid, flavonoids, folia Citronellae, folia Melissaecitratae, Frauenkraut (German), garden balm, Garten-Melisse (German), gastrovegetalin, geranial, geraniol, geranyl acetate, germacrene, Hasenohr (German), heart’s delight, hemicellulose, Herzbrot (German), Herzkraut (German), Herztrost (German), hexadecanoic acid, hjärtansfröjd (Swedish), hjertensfryd (Danish, Norwegian), honey plant, Honigblum (German), honungsblomma (Swedish), hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, Immenchrut (German), Ivenblatt (German), Kneipp® Melisse Pflanzensaft, Labiatae/Lamiaceae (family), lemon melissa, lemon-balm, lignin, Limonikraut (German), linalool, lomaherpan, luteolin, luteolin 3′-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside, luteolin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, medunka lékarská (Czech), méhfu (Hungarian), melisa (Polish, Spanish), melisa lekarska (Polish), melissa, Melissa officinalis, Melissa officinalis L., Melissa oleum, melissa vera (Italian), Melissae, Melissae folium, melisse (Danish, French, German, Norwegian), mélisse (French), mélisse officinale (French), Melissenblatt (German), Melissengeist (German), melissört (Swedish), meliza (Spanish), methyl citronellate, metrilic acid, mézontófu (Hungarian), modergräs (Swedish), moderurt (Norwegian), monoterpene glycosides, Mutterkraut (German), Mutterwurz (German), navadna melisa (Slovenian), neral, nerol, Nervenkräutel (German), neryl acetate, nitrogen, oleanolic acid, ocimene, orvosi citromfu (Hungarian), p-coumaric acid, pentadecanal, Pfaffenkraut (German), polyphenolic compounds, proline, protein, quercetin, Riechnessel (German), rosmarinic acid, rutin, sabinene, Salatkräutle (German), sesquiterpenes, sidrunmeliss (Estonian), sitronmelisse (Norwegian), sitruunamelissa (Finnish), Spanischer Salbei (German), squalene, succinic acid, sweet balm, sweet mary, tannins, terpin-4-ol, thé de France (French), toronjil (Spanish), trace metals, trans-caryophyllene, triterpenes, triterpenoids, ursolic acid, valverde boutons de fievre crème (French), volatile oils, Wanzenkraut (German), Zahnwehkraut (German), zeaxanthin, Zitronella (German), Zitronenkraut (German), Zitronenmelisse (German), Zitronen-Melisse (German). The flowers are red and tubular, which is appealing to hummingbirds, a prime pollinator. 22, Salusan, Santane D5, Santane N9, Schlaf- und Nerventee, Sedacur, Seda-Grandelat, Sedantol, Seda-Plantina®, Sedariston, Sedaselect N, Sedasyx, Sedatol, Sedatruw S, Sedinfant N, Seracalm, Sidroga Herz-Kreislauf-Tee, Sidroga Kindertee, Sidroga Magen-Darm-Tee, Sidroga Nerven- und Schlaftee, Sirmiosta Nervenelixier N, Sol Schoum, Songha, Songha Night, Soporin, Species nervinae, St Radegunder Beruhigungs- und Einschlaftee, St Radegunder Fiebertee, St Radegunder Herz-Kreislauf-Tonikum, St Radegunder Herz-Kreislaufunterstutzender Tee, St Radegunder Magenberuhigungstee, St Radegunder Nerventee, St Radegunder Nerven-Tonikum, St Radegunder Reizmildernder Magentee, St Radegunder Rosmarin-Wein, Stullmaton, STW 5, STW 5-II (bitter candy tuft, matricaria flower, peppermint leaves, caraway, licorice root, and lemon balm), STW-5-S (matricaria flower, peppermint leaves, caraway, licorice root, and lemon balm), SX Valeriana comp, Synpharma InstantNerventee, Teekanne Magen- und Darmtee, Teekanne Schlaf- und Nerventee, The Brioni, The Chambard-Tee, The Franklin, Tisana Arnaldi, Tisana Cisbey, Tisana Kelemata, Tisane antiflatulente pour les enfants, Tisane calmante pour les enfants, Tisane des familles, Tisane favorisant l’allaitement, Tisane Grande Chartreuse, Tisane pour le coeur et la circulation, Tisane pour le foie, Tisane pour le sommeil et les nerfs, Tisane pour les enfants, Tisane pour l’estomac, Tisane purgative, Tisane relaxante, Tisane Touraine, Vagostabyl, Valerina Day Time, Valerina Night-Time, Valverde Dragées pour la détente, Wechseltee, Ze185. Background Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) is an herb that grows in southern Europe. Lemon balm is believed to have sedative, anti-gas, fever-reducing, antibacterial, spasm-reducing, blood pressure-lowering, memory-enhancing, menstruation-inducing, and thyroid-related effects, and it is thought by some to be an herbal cure-all. Research suggests that lemon balm may contain high levels of antioxidants. Lemon balm is a member of the Lamiaceae family, which also includes dittany, mint, sage, siderites, and sweet marjoram.

Research appears to support the use of lemon balm applied directly to the skin to manage herpes infection symptoms. Lemon balm has also been studied for a number of medical conditions, including anxiety, stomach lining inflammation, and irritable bowel syndrome. An infusion of 1 teaspoon of dried Balm per cup of freshly boiled water will help soothe an anxious stomach and a nervous headache, and sipped slowly should help calm palpitations and panic attacks. Human herpesvirus type 3 is also referred to as varicella-zoster virus or VZV. Research suggests that lemon balm applied to the skin may effectively treat symptoms of herpes simplex infections. It is then strained for oil, or prepared as Lemon Balm Melissa Ointment. It is by far our most popular herbal ointment for herpes and related skin irritations.

Strain. Although findings are promising, more research is needed to better understand these effects. A combination treatment containing lemon balm has been studied in the treatment of infant colic. Early research suggests that it may be an effective treatment for this condition. Although results are promising, more studies are needed. Lemon balm-containing treatments have been used for stomach pain, discomfort, and bloating. The best natural treatment to relieve the pain of shingles is by using capsaicin, a constituent found in cayenne.

There is a lack of high-quality evidence supporting the use of lemon balm as a sleep aid. Most studies have used lemon balm in combination products. More research is needed to determine the potential sedative effects of lemon balm alone. The tea can also be used to bathe and wash wounds, or may be taken internally. Applied to the affected area, lemon balm helps heal cold the sores in about 3-5 days. Tradition / Theory The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. There’s good reason for this.

Comfrey and Plantain both contain a compound called Allantoin, which is a natural cell regenerator that repairs while simultaneously depressing inflammation. Varro Tyler, Ph.D., dean and professor emeritus of pharmacognosy (natural product pharmacy) at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, suggests using lemon balm to treat viral infections…I suggest drinking the tea as well as applying it directly to the rash. Alzheimer’s disease, analgesic (pain relief), angiogenesis (blood vessel growth), anorexia, antibacterial, antifungal, antihistamine (antiallergy), anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antineoplastic (anticancer), antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiprotozoal (treats infections), antispasmodic (reduces muscle spasms), antivenom, antiviral, aromatic, atherosclerosis (clogged arteries), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), blood disorders, bone density, cancer, cardiovascular conditions (heart conditions), chronic bronchitis (lung inflammation), chronic fatigue syndrome, coughs, dementia, diabetes, digestive aid, emmenagogue (stimulates menstruation), fever reduction, flatulence (gassiness), food preservation, gastrointestinal conditions (stomach conditions), Graves’ disease (overactive thyroid), headaches, high blood pressure, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hormone regulation, immunomodulator (affects the immune system), influenza (flu), insect bites, insecticide, irregular menstrual cycles, lipid-lowering effects, migraine, mood, motion sickness, nausea, neuralgia (nerve pain and damage), neurasthenia (fatigue and weakness), radioprotection (protect from radiation), sedative (sleep aid), shingles (chicken pox virus), skin irritations, sweat stimulation, tension headache, thyroid conditions, toothache, typhus (bacterial disease), vasodilatation (widens blood vessels), vomiting, wound healing. A common dose of lemon balm is one cup of tea taken by mouth several times daily as needed. Some evidence suggests using 1.5-4.5 grams of lemon balm herb in tea by mouth several times daily. An infused oil of St. About 1 varicella during pregnant.

Single doses of 300 milligrams, 600 milligrams, and 900 milligrams of lemon balm extract have been studied. For agitation in dementia, a lotion containing lemon balm essential oils has been applied directly to the hands and face twice daily. 1 milliliter of lotion containing 100 milligrams of melissa oil has been massaged into the hands and upper arms for 1-2 minutes twice daily for 12 weeks. For anxiety and sleep quality, the product, Cyracos®, has been taken by mouth for 15 days. Information on dosing is unavailable at this time. For mental performance, 60 drops of lemon balm extract have been taken by mouth daily. Doses of 600, 1,000, and 1,600 milligrams of dried leaf capsules (Pharmaton) have been taken by mouth at weekly intervals.

For symptoms of herpes simplex virus infections, a cream containing 1% lemon balm extract has been applied directly to the skin up to five times daily for 14 days. A tea containing lemon balm (prepared by steeping 2-3 grams of lemon balm leaf in 150 milliliters of boiling water for 5-10 minutes and then straining) has been applied to herpes lesions with a cotton ball several times daily. Safety The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. Some reports estimate 31 million cases occur in sexually active adults annually in the United States. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects. Avoid in people who have a known allergy or sensitivity to lemon balm, any of its parts, or other plants of the genus Melissa. Allergic reactions have been reported, including burning sensation, contact dermatitis, prickling sensation, and skin irritation and reddening. Lemon balm is likely safe when applied to the skin or taken by mouth in recommended doses (up to 30 days) in otherwise healthy adults and when consumed in amounts normally found in foods. Lemon balm is well tolerated when taken by mouth for up to eight weeks. Research found minimal side effects associated with applying lemon balm to the skin for up to 10 days. Lemon balm has been given Generally Regarded as Safe (GRAS) status in the United States, with a maximum level of 0.5% in baked goods.

Lemon balm may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in people with diabetes or hypoglycemia, and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may need to be monitored by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, and medication adjustments may be necessary. Lemon balm may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in people taking drugs or herbs and supplements that lower blood pressure. Drowsiness or sedation may occur. Use caution if driving or operating heavy machinery.

St.-John’s-Wort…Hypericin, one of the compounds in St.-John’s-wort, also fights the herpes viruse…Typical dosage: 300 milligrams in capsules three times per day; or 15 to 40 drops of tincture three times per day; or 3 cups of tea per day (steep 1 teaspoon of dried plant in one cup of hot water for 10 minutes). To use the Lavender Floral Facial Mask take 1 TBSP. Caution: May cause increased skin reactions to sun exposure. Use cautiously in people who are taking central nervous system (CNS) depressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Use cautiously in people who have glaucoma, as lemon balm may increase eye pressure. Use cautiously in people who have heart conditions, as lemon balm may reduce heart rate. Use cautiously in people with thyroid disorders, as lemon balm may interfere with thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

Use cautiously in people taking antiangiogensis agents (preventing blood vessel growth), as lemon balm has shown to inhibit blood vessel growth in in animal research. Avoid in pregnant or breastfeeding women, due to a lack of safety data and a possible connection between lemon balm and lead contamination. Avoid in people who have a known allergy or sensitivity to lemon balm, any of its parts, or other plants of the genus Melissa. Allergic reactions have been reported, including burning sensation, contact dermatitis, prickling sensation, and skin irritation and reddening. Lemon balm may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by alcohol and some drugs. Examples include benzodiazepines such as lorazepam (Ativan®) or diazepam (Valium®), barbiturates such as phenobarbital, narcotics such as codeine, some antidepressants, and alcohol. Caution is advised while driving or operating machinery.
Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) - Abby's Health & Nutrition

Lemon balm may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. People taking insulin or drugs for diabetes by mouth should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary. Lemon balm may cause low blood pressure. In fact, herpes zoster in people who are HIV positive may be a sign of full-blown AIDS. Lemon balm may interfere with the way the body processes certain drugs using the liver’s cytochrome P450 enzyme system.

As a result, the levels of these drugs may be increased in the blood and may cause increased effects or potentially serious adverse reactions. People using any medications should check the package insert and speak with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, about possible interactions. Lemon balm may also interact with agents that affect blood vessel width and growth, agents that affect GABA transaminase, agents that affect the immune system, agents that affect the nervous system, agents that may block nerve impulses, agents that prevent muscle spasms, agents that treat skin disorders, agents that treat stomach problems, Alzheimer’s agents, antianxiety agents, antibiotics, anticancer agents, antidepressants, antifungal agents, antihistamines, anti-inflammatory agents, antiobesity agents, antiprotozoal agents, antithyroid agents, antiulcer and gastric acid-reducing agents, antivirals, barbiturates, bone formation agents, cholesterol-lowering agents, eye and glaucoma agents, heart health agents, hormonal agents, sleep agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and thyroid agents. Lemon balm may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment. Lemon balm may cause low blood pressure.

Caution is advised in people taking herbs or supplements that lower blood pressure. Lemon balm may interfere with the way the body processes certain herbs or supplements using the liver’s cytochrome P450 enzyme system. As a result, the levels of other herbs or supplements may become too high in the blood. It may also alter the effects that other herbs or supplements possibly have on the cytochrome P450 system. Lemon balm may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some herbs or supplements. Lemon balm may also interact with Alzheimer’s herbs and supplements, antianxiety herbs and supplements, antibacterials, anticancer herbs and supplements, antidepressants, antifungals, antihistamines, anti-inflammatory herbs and supplements, antiobesity herbs and supplements, antioxidants, antiprotozoal herbs and supplements, antiulcer and gastric acid-reducing herbs and supplements, antivirals, bone formation herbs and supplements, cholesterol-lowering herbs and supplements, glaucoma herbs and supplements, heart health herbs and supplements, herbs and supplements that affect blood vessel width and growth, herbs and supplements that affect GABA transaminase, herbs and supplements that affect the immune system, herbs and supplements that affect the nervous system, herbs and supplements that block nerve impulses, herbs and supplements that prevent muscle spasms, herbs and supplements that protect against radiation, herbs and supplements that treat skin disorders, herbs and supplements that treat stomach disorders, herbs and supplements used for sleep, hormonal herbs and supplements, insect repellants, and thyroid herbs and supplements. Bibliography Atanassova M and Georgieva S.

Comparative polyphenol composition and antioxidant capacity of the Bulgarian plants (dry herbs). Electronic Journal of Environmental, Agricultural and Food Chemistry 2012;9(9):1514-1523. Orange oil was among the most potent essential oils tested in the study. The anti-angiogenic herbal extracts Ob-X from Morus alba, Melissa officinalis, and Artemisia capillaris suppresses adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Pharm.Biol. 2011;49(8):775-783. Howes MJ and Perry E.

The role of phytochemicals in the treatment and prevention of dementia. Drugs Aging 6-1-2011;28(6):439-468. Hussain AI, Farooq Anwar, Nigam PS, et al. Antibacterial activity of some Lamiaceae essential oils using resazurin as an indicator of cell growth. LWT – Food Science and Technology 2012;44(4):1199-1206. Komes D, Belscak-Cvitanovic A, Horzic D, et al. Phenolic composition and antioxidant properties of some traditionally used medicinal plants affected by the extraction time and hydrolysis.

Phytochem.Anal. 2011;22(2):172-180. Lara MS, Gutierrez JI, Timon M, et al. Evaluation of two natural extracts (Rosmarinus officinalis L. and Melissa officinalis L.) as antioxidants in cooked pork patties packed in MAP. Meat.Sci. Each blister or ulcer is typically only 1-3 millimeters in size, and the blisters or ulcers tend to occur in groups.

Obulesu M and Rao DM. Effect of plant extracts on Alzheimer’s disease: An insight into therapeutic avenues. J.Neurosci.Rural.Pract. 2011;2(1):56-61. Oh C, Price J, Brindley MA, et al. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by aqueous extracts of Prunella vulgaris L. Virol.J.

2011;8:188. Posadzki P, Watson LK, and Ernst E. Adverse effects of herbal medicines: an overview of systematic reviews. Clin Med. 2013;13(1):7-12. Rasmussen P. Lemon balm–Melissa officinalis; also known as lemon balm, bee balm, garden balm, Melissa, melissengeist.

J.Prim.Health Care 2011;3(2):165-166. Spiridon I, Colceru S, Anghel N, et al. Antioxidant capacity and total phenolic contents of oregano (Origanum vulgare), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) from Romania. Both chicken pox and shingles are the same virus as herpes. 2011;25(17):1657-1661. Valussi, M. Functional foods with digestion-enhancing properties.

Int J Food Sci.Nutr 2012;63 Suppl 1:82-89. Vitullo M, Ripabelli G, Fanelli I, et al. Microbiological and toxicological quality of dried herbs. Lett.Appl.Microbiol. 2011;52(6):573-580. Yoon M and Kim MY. The anti-angiogenic herbal composition Ob-X from Morus alba, Melissa officinalis, and Artemisia capillaris regulates obesity in genetically obese ob/ob mice.

Pharm.Biol. 2011;49(6):614-619. Zeraatpishe A, Oryan S, Bagheri MH, et al. Effects of Melissa officinalis L. on oxidative status and DNA damage in subjects exposed to long-term low-dose ionizing radiation. Toxicol.Ind.Health 2011;27(3):205-212. The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns.

This syndrome of pain in the area of the previously infected nerve is called postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), and it can be quite severe and debilitating. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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