Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) – Arbor Farms

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) - Arbor Farms

I suffer from cold sores frequently but cold sore creams etc have never worked and I have tried all sorts of other oils creams lotions with no success. It should not be used in people with hypothyroidism. On an emotional level Melissa banishes negativity, depression and fills one with hope and joy. According to Dr. Lemon balm is believed to have sedative, anti-gas, fever-reducing, antibacterial, spasm-reducing, blood pressure-lowering, memory-enhancing, menstruation-inducing, and thyroid-related effects, and it is thought by some to be an herbal cure-all. An excellent choice for diffuser use, or diluted and massaged into lymph nodes or above and below the balls of the feet. Essential Oil of Helichrysum italicum is an important treatment for wound healing, to help prevent scaring, acne, inflammation and joint pain.

Hill is careful to include both the encouraging results and the counter indications. PubMed: Comparison between effects of different doses of Melissa officinalis and atorvastatin on the activity of liver enzymes in hypercholesterolemia rats. Within two days  the cold sore diameter had reduced by 60% and itching reduced by 80%. Melissa is one of the anti-viral essential oil, which was shown particularly efficacious against the herpes virus (HSV). (2002). General: We always recommend that you consult with a qualified health care practitioner before using pure essential oils, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, or currently taking any form of medication. Although there are fewer online customer reviews for the supplement (12 on iherb.com, 3 on Amazon, and zero on evitamins.com), those that exist are overwhelmingly positive, with an average rating of 4.5 stars out of 5 across all sites.

This inhibitory chemical regulates and quiets over-firing nerves in times of stress. I tried some natural routes; Lysine – an amino acid – seemed to help, but not all the time, and not unless I took it (and a LOT of it) before the outbreaks would occur. A combination treatment containing lemon balm has been studied in the treatment of infant colic. Early research suggests that it may be an effective treatment for this condition. Although results are promising, more studies are needed. Lemon balm-containing treatments have been used for stomach pain, discomfort, and bloating. While some results are positive, more studies looking at the effects of lemon balm alone are needed to determine its effectiveness.

There is a lack of high-quality evidence supporting the use of lemon balm as a sleep aid. Many of the components of Bay Laurel are found in other herb/spice oils such as Rosemary. Johnswort is most renowned as a remedy for nervous tension and nerve damage. The London-based Herpes Virus Association speaks highly of it, and it is the effective ingredient in the German product Lomaherpan which is not available in the United States. PubMed: Effects of IAA, IBA, NAA, and GA3 on rooting and morphological features of Melissa officinalis L. Tradition / Theory The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven.

In vitro activity of tea-tree oil against clinical skin isolates of meticillin-resistant and -sensitive staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci growing planktonically and as biofilms. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below. Because they are meant to be added to water, nearly all brands formulate their extract using a mixture of 50-75% grain alcohol and deionized water. As long as the above dosage indications are respected, there is no reason to fear Lemon Balm side effects. One drop of Melissa directly applied a few times a day throughout the outbreak, and for the next several times an outbreak was surfacing, might lead to remission of the disease. A dose of 2-6 milliliters three times daily has been taken by mouth. A dose of 8-10 grams of lemon balm leaves has been taken by mouth daily.

Single doses of 300 milligrams, 600 milligrams, and 900 milligrams of lemon balm extract have been studied. For agitation in dementia, a lotion containing lemon balm essential oils has been applied directly to the hands and face twice daily. 1 milliliter of lotion containing 100 milligrams of melissa oil has been massaged into the hands and upper arms for 1-2 minutes twice daily for 12 weeks. For anxiety and sleep quality, the product, Cyracos®, has been taken by mouth for 15 days. Information on dosing is unavailable at this time. Johnswort has received mixed reviews for its over use as a treatment for anxiety and depression. Doses of 600, 1,000, and 1,600 milligrams of dried leaf capsules (Pharmaton) have been taken by mouth at weekly intervals.

PubMed: Multi-element analysis of mineral and trace elements in medicinal herbs and their infusions. A tea containing lemon balm (prepared by steeping 2-3 grams of lemon balm leaf in 150 milliliters of boiling water for 5-10 minutes and then straining) has been applied to herpes lesions with a cotton ball several times daily. Safety The U.S. (2010). There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

For sufferer’s of Shingles, another Herpes virus variety causing lesions of the skin, Ravensara (Ravensara aromatica, or ‘True’ Ravensara) oil has been used. Avoid in people who have a known allergy or sensitivity to lemon balm, any of its parts, or other plants of the genus Melissa. Allergic reactions have been reported, including burning sensation, contact dermatitis, prickling sensation, and skin irritation and reddening. Lemon balm is likely safe when applied to the skin or taken by mouth in recommended doses (up to 30 days) in otherwise healthy adults and when consumed in amounts normally found in foods. Lemon balm is well tolerated when taken by mouth for up to eight weeks. Research found minimal side effects associated with applying lemon balm to the skin for up to 10 days. Lemon balm has been given Generally Regarded as Safe (GRAS) status in the United States, with a maximum level of 0.5% in baked goods.

Lemon balm may lower blood sugar levels. Having said that, certain drug interactions have been reported, and it is believed that interactions may be attributed to the pharmacologically active hyperforin, when taken with SSRI’s. Blood glucose levels may need to be monitored by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, and medication adjustments may be necessary. PubMed: Isolation of Cronobacter sakazakii from different herbal teas. Caution is advised in people taking drugs or herbs and supplements that lower blood pressure. Drowsiness or sedation may occur. In vitro and in vivo killing of ocular demodex by tea tree oil.

Lemon balm may increase the sedative effects of alcohol. Lemon balm may cause agitation, anal pain, anxiety, bone problems, changes in alertness, chest pain, diarrhea, dizziness, headache, heart palpitations, increased bodyweight, morning sleepiness, nausea, skin irritation on contact, skin redness, burning, pigmentation, and tingling, sleep disturbances, stomach pain, sweating, tiredness, vomiting, wheezing, and worsening of herpes. Use cautiously in people who have autoimmune disorders or who are taking agents that may affect immune system function. Use cautiously in people who are taking central nervous system (CNS) depressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Use cautiously in people who have glaucoma, as lemon balm may increase eye pressure. Use cautiously in people who have heart conditions, as lemon balm may reduce heart rate. Use cautiously in people with thyroid disorders, as lemon balm may interfere with thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

Use cautiously in people taking antiangiogensis agents (preventing blood vessel growth), as lemon balm has shown to inhibit blood vessel growth in in animal research. Avoid in pregnant or breastfeeding women, due to a lack of safety data and a possible connection between lemon balm and lead contamination. Avoid in people who have a known allergy or sensitivity to lemon balm, any of its parts, or other plants of the genus Melissa. Allergic reactions have been reported, including burning sensation, contact dermatitis, prickling sensation, and skin irritation and reddening. Lemon balm may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by alcohol and some drugs. Examples include benzodiazepines such as lorazepam (Ativan®) or diazepam (Valium®), barbiturates such as phenobarbital, narcotics such as codeine, some antidepressants, and alcohol. PubMed: Neuroprotective properties of melissa officinalis L.
Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) - Arbor Farms

Lemon balm may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 42, 591-5. Medication adjustments may be necessary. Lemon balm may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in people taking drugs that lower blood pressure. Lemon balm may interfere with the way the body processes certain drugs using the liver’s cytochrome P450 enzyme system.

As a result, the levels of these drugs may be increased in the blood and may cause increased effects or potentially serious adverse reactions. People using any medications should check the package insert and speak with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, about possible interactions. Lemon balm may also interact with agents that affect blood vessel width and growth, agents that affect GABA transaminase, agents that affect the immune system, agents that affect the nervous system, agents that may block nerve impulses, agents that prevent muscle spasms, agents that treat skin disorders, agents that treat stomach problems, Alzheimer’s agents, antianxiety agents, antibiotics, anticancer agents, antidepressants, antifungal agents, antihistamines, anti-inflammatory agents, antiobesity agents, antiprotozoal agents, antithyroid agents, antiulcer and gastric acid-reducing agents, antivirals, barbiturates, bone formation agents, cholesterol-lowering agents, eye and glaucoma agents, heart health agents, hormonal agents, sleep agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and thyroid agents. Lemon balm may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment. Lemon balm may cause low blood pressure.

Caution is advised in people taking herbs or supplements that lower blood pressure. Lemon balm may interfere with the way the body processes certain herbs or supplements using the liver’s cytochrome P450 enzyme system. PubMed: Phenolic composition and antioxidant properties of some traditionally used medicinal plants affected by the extraction time and hydrolysis. It may also alter the effects that other herbs or supplements possibly have on the cytochrome P450 system. Lemon balm may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some herbs or supplements. (2006). Bibliography Atanassova M and Georgieva S.

Comparative polyphenol composition and antioxidant capacity of the Bulgarian plants (dry herbs). Electronic Journal of Environmental, Agricultural and Food Chemistry 2012;9(9):1514-1523. Hong Y, Kim MY, and Yoon M. The anti-angiogenic herbal extracts Ob-X from Morus alba, Melissa officinalis, and Artemisia capillaris suppresses adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Pharm.Biol. 2011;49(8):775-783. Howes MJ and Perry E.

The role of phytochemicals in the treatment and prevention of dementia. Drugs Aging 6-1-2011;28(6):439-468. Hussain AI, Farooq Anwar, Nigam PS, et al. Antibacterial activity of some Lamiaceae essential oils using resazurin as an indicator of cell growth. LWT – Food Science and Technology 2012;44(4):1199-1206. PubMed: Neuroprotective and neurological properties of Melissa officinalis. Phenolic composition and antioxidant properties of some traditionally used medicinal plants affected by the extraction time and hydrolysis.

Phytochem.Anal. F., & Riley, T. Lara MS, Gutierrez JI, Timon M, et al. Evaluation of two natural extracts (Rosmarinus officinalis L. and Melissa officinalis L.) as antioxidants in cooked pork patties packed in MAP. Meat.Sci. 2011;88(3):481-488.

Obulesu M and Rao DM. Effect of plant extracts on Alzheimer’s disease: An insight into therapeutic avenues. J.Neurosci.Rural.Pract. 2011;2(1):56-61. Oh C, Price J, Brindley MA, et al. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by aqueous extracts of Prunella vulgaris L. Virol.J.

2011;8:188. PubMed: Endothelium-dependent induction of vasorelaxation by Melissa officinalis L. Adverse effects of herbal medicines: an overview of systematic reviews. Clin Med. Sharma S, Araujo M, Wu M, Qaqush J & Charles C. Rasmussen P. Lemon balm–Melissa officinalis; also known as lemon balm, bee balm, garden balm, Melissa, melissengeist.

J.Prim.Health Care 2011;3(2):165-166. Spiridon I, Colceru S, Anghel N, et al. Antioxidant capacity and total phenolic contents of oregano (Origanum vulgare), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) from Romania. Nat.Prod.Res. 2011;25(17):1657-1661. Valussi, M. Functional foods with digestion-enhancing properties.

Int J Food Sci.Nutr 2012;63 Suppl 1:82-89. Vitullo M, Ripabelli G, Fanelli I, et al. Microbiological and toxicological quality of dried herbs. Lett.Appl.Microbiol. var. Yoon M and Kim MY. The anti-angiogenic herbal composition Ob-X from Morus alba, Melissa officinalis, and Artemisia capillaris regulates obesity in genetically obese ob/ob mice.

(2010). 2011;49(6):614-619. Zeraatpishe A, Oryan S, Bagheri MH, et al. Effects of Melissa officinalis L. on oxidative status and DNA damage in subjects exposed to long-term low-dose ionizing radiation. Toxicol.Ind.Health 2011;27(3):205-212. The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns.

Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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