[Mother-infant and indirect transmission of HSV infection: treatment and prevention] – Abstract

[Mother-infant and indirect transmission of HSV infection: treatment and prevention] - Abstract

[Mother-infant and indirect transmission of HSV infection: treatment and prevention] - Abstract
All herpesviruses have a tegument, a layer of protein located between the virus capsid and membrane. These have four main principles:  Antivirals, immune boosters, heal the nervous system, and to support or detoxify the liver. Reciprocal cross-titrations of these sera were done on antigens of types 1 and 2 by the indirect immunofluorescence technique. Immunol. Microbiol.28, 392–399 (1974). Man to woman contamination was generally reported: 10p.100 of the couples were serodiscordant. For example, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of tuberculosis, is passed on like this.

Take care. The risk of neonatal contamination is greatest for primary infection (PI) or non-primary infection occurring the last month of pregnancy (50p.100), but transmission is low for maternal recurrence during the week before delivery (5p.100). Following coculture with infected cells, iNKT cells were no longer responsive to further stimulation with α-GalCer-loaded CD1d. Antiviral treatment is formally indicated if: 1) neonate viral cultures are positive at day 1 and day 3, 2) clinical lesions suggest herpes, 3) neurological disorders or signs of sepsis with negative bacteriology are present and the mother has a history of herpes or contact with labial herpes; and can be discussed if: 4) PI is proven at delivery or during the last month of pregnancy (irrespective of the delivery route, even if the mother is treated or if the membranes are intact), 5) late cesarean (membrane rupture>4 h) with clinical herpes at delivery, 6) vaginal delivery and recurrent herpes within the last month with associated clinical risk factor(s). When considering the epidemiology of a disease outbreak, it is preferable to draw conclusions from fact, rather than forming conjecture based on uncertainties. New perspectives concerning diagnosis and prevention of neonatal contamination include: identification of asymptomatic primary infections using rapid identification of genital viral antigen during delivery, identification of women with a risk of asymptomatic excretion using specific serology tests for the pregnant woman and her partner, antiviral treatment for men, topical genital treatments, vaccination of women at risk, monoclonal antibodies, new antiviral agents with mechanisms of action independent of viral thymidine kinase.

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