Pityriasis rosea following human papillomavirus vaccination

Pityriasis rosea following human papillomavirus vaccination

It is probably caused by a virus. We review these aspects of the disease. Fourth, it was stated that PR is “…skin rash that usually begins as one large circular or oval spot on your chest, abdomen, or back, …”1 This statement refers to PR in general and is incorrect as only about 30%–40% of patients with PR have identifiable herald patches.6 Moreover, it gives us no information on the morphology, distribution, and time sequence of rash for the 54-year-old patient with schizophrenia. HHV-7 DNA was detected in 13 of 30 (43%) samples of PBMC of the patients with PR and 14 of 25 (56%) samples of PBMC of controls. If a drug is suspected but is medically indicated, refer the patient to a dermatologist and, if appropriate, a relevant specialist (such as a neurologist about antiepileptic treatment) to help with decisions about whether to stop the drug. Notably, most of the morphologically atypical forms follow a course amenable to the classic form. Unlike tinea corporis lesions, which typically have central clearing, pityriasis rosea lesions have central scaling.

Pityriasis rosea following human papillomavirus vaccination
Pityriasis rosea was diagnosed. HHV-7 DNA in plasma (170genome equivalents/mL) and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (657 genome equivalents/mL) were found by calibrated quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, as reported.2 HHV-6 DNA was neither found in plasma nor in PBMCs. There is usually a higher incidence in the spring and fall, but it can occur year-round. Human herpesvirus 7 DNA sequences were detected in six of the PR patients (28.57%). Our second patient was a 20-year-old woman who developed a typical PR two months after the third dose of HPV vaccination. 1). Routine investigations turned out normal.

IgG antibodies against HHV-6 and HHV-7 were present (1/320 and 1/160, respectively) whereas IgM was negative. HHV-6 and HHV-7 DNAs were positive in plasma (137 and 85copies/mL) and in PBMCs (570 and 464copies/mL). Thirteen patients were from the neighboring state of Bihar. “Is Pityriasis Rosea contagious?” It is not contagious, though there have been reports of small epidemics in fraternity houses, military bases, schools and gyms. Pityriasis rosea (PR) is a self-limiting exanthematic disease, due to an endogenous reactivation of HHV-6 and/or HHV-7.2 PR and PR-like eruptions have very rarely been described after vaccination against diphtheria, tuberculosis, poliomyelitis, tetanus3 but never after HPV vaccination. All the lesions were arranged in a Christmas tree pattern. Cutaneous mastocytosis, psoriasis guttata, and atypical pityriasis roses were taken into consideration as differential diagnoses.

The pathogenetic mechanisms leading to post-vaccination PR is unknown. We believe that the non-specific immune stimulation and the subsequent release of cytokines5 may trigger HHV-6 and/or HHV-7 reactivation and therefore the occurrence of PR. Investigators have reported positive[25],[26],[27],[28],[29],[30],[31], and negative[32],[33] results.

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