Recurrent HSV-1 corneal lesions in rabbits induced by cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone. – PubMed

Recurrent HSV-1 corneal lesions in rabbits induced by cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone. - PubMed

Recurrent HSV-1 corneal lesions in rabbits induced by cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone. - PubMed
Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ocular shedding and recurrent corneal epithelial lesions were assessed following ocular iontophoresis of 0.01% timolol at 0.8 mAmp for 8 min for 3 consecutive days in 17 rabbits latently infected with HSV-1 strain McKrae. HSV-1 is typically spread by contact with infected saliva, while HSV-2 is usually spread sexually or via the mother’s genital tract to her newborn baby. Half of the infected rabbits and all of the uninfected controls received topical 1.0% trifluridine five time a day for 9 days, beginning the day after the first iontophoresis. The NLRP3(-/-) mice developed more-severe and earlier stromal keratitis lesions and had higher angiogenesis scores than did infected wild-type animals. The ratio of positive days of epithelial lesions per total days was 82/187 (44%). There were 46 punctate lesions, 27 dendritic lesions and 40 geographic epithelial defects. The HHV1 virus is more likely to be spread through things like sharing eating utensils, razors, and towels from a person who has an active lesion.

Of the 82 positive lesion days, 54 (66%) were associated with a positive swab. Of the 78 positive swabs, 54 (69%) were associated with an epithelial lesion. Of the 54 days of both positive lesion and swab, 16 (30%) were associated with a dendritic lesion. Of the 158 negative swabs, 110 (70%) were associated with no epithelial lesions. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is the main cause of herpes infections that occur on the mouth and lips.

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