Successful treatment of experimental B virus (Herpesvirus simiae) infection with acyclovir.

Successful treatment of experimental B virus (Herpesvirus simiae) infection with acyclovir.

Successful treatment of experimental B virus (Herpesvirus simiae) infection with acyclovir.
A two-year-old, female, simian immunodeficiency virus E543-infected rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was presented for necropsy following euthanasia due to a history of diarrhea, weight loss, and a small, round ulcer along the left labial commisure. Simians such as cynomolgus and rhesus macaques, African green monkeys, and marmosets are widely used for biomedical research, but despite this extensive close contact very few simian viruses have been shown to pose a threat of infection or illness to humans. To study immunoregulatory functions involved in susceptibility/resistance against interspecies transmission, the SHBV glycoprotein C (gC(SHBV)) gene (encoding 467 aa) was isolated. PCR appeared to be more sensitive than conventional virus isolation and thus of practical use for a rapid identification of B virus infection when conventional viral cultures are negative. Withdrawing treatment after 9-10 days resulted in late-onset fatal disease in some rabbits. During 1990, an increase in the number of monkeys converting to positive status and the discovery of an indeterminate status demonstrated that latency of B-virus in the rhesus may have the potential to defeat an eradication attempt not conscientiously pursued. The plasma half life of acyclovir is twice as long in man as in rabbits and progression of the disease is much slower.

Neonatal infections are most frequently caused by HSV-2 but HSV-1 infections are also common. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (663K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Links to PubMed are also available for Selected References.

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