Using a 3-O-sulfated heparin octasaccharide to inhibit the entry of herpes simplex virus type 1. – PubMed

Using a 3-O-sulfated heparin octasaccharide to inhibit the entry of herpes simplex virus type 1. - PubMed
Using a 3-O-sulfated heparin octasaccharide to inhibit the entry of herpes simplex virus type 1. - PubMed

After a group of scientists discovered that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) can infect and multiply in human neurons, as previously reported by HNGN, a new team of University of North Carolina Health Care researchers have released a study that sheds light on the cellular mechanism in neurons that reactivates the virus and allows it to escape neurons and stimulate disease. The unique heparan sulfate saccharide sequence offers the binding site for viral envelope proteins and plays critical roles in assisting viral infections. Using both wild-type virus and a mutant virus that is unable to undergo replication in neurons, we found that histone H3 associates with viral gene promoters by 7 days postinfection (dpi). In this study, we identified loss of IkappaBalpha as a marker of NF-kappaB activation, and infection with mutants with individual immediate-early (IE) regulatory proteins deleted indicated that ICP27 was necessary for IkappaBalpha loss. The resultant 3-O-sulfated octasaccharide has a structure of Delta UA2S-GlcNS6S-IdoUA2S-GlcNS6S-IdoUA2S-GlcNS3S6S-IdoUA2S-GlcNS6S (where Delta UA is 4-deoxy-alpha-L-threo-hex-4-enopyranosyluronic acid, GlcN is D-glucosamine, and IdoUA is L-iduronic acid). Heparin is a widely used anticoagulant drug with more than $4 billion dollars in worldwide annual sales. Our study demonstrates the discordance between infections measured by biomarkers and self-reports of having had sex among orphan adolescents in Kenya.

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